A MOMENT WITH THE BOARD

The NYCT Gotham had a conversation with our newly elected Secretary Lisa M. Rodriguez about the industry and the NYCT. Below are the answers to some of the questions posed to her.

What do you hope to hope to accomplish during your tenure on the Board?

L.R. Most of all I would like to be helpful. I’ve been translating since 2011 and the ATA and NYCT have given me an enormous amount of help. I’d like to give back, whether that means preparing the minutes of our Board meetings, proctoring the ATA certification exam, helping at meetings and workshops or just making newcomers and others feel welcome and included in the Circle. The quality of the NYCT meetings and workshops is very high. The Literary workshop is one that certainly stands out.

What do you feel are the most pressing needs for the Circle?

L.R. The Circle needs to continue to have active meetings. The November 2015 meeting was filled to capacity. It was standing room only. The biggest issue at that time was getting enough chairs for everyone. All meetings should have that problem.

What do you feel is the most pressing issue for the industry in general?

L.R. Good professional development comes to mind. I’ve worked in two other industries, and I believe that new translators have access to excellent support from associations, professional development classes and experienced colleagues-much more than what new professionals receive in some other fields.

How did you come to the industry?

L.R. I started as a teacher. I taught in Spain for 16 years. When I returned to the States I found myself in financial services. After my job moved to the west coast, I completed the NYU program and transitioned into translating. The NYU program was very helpful. It was the perfect program for me.

What hidden talent do you have?

L.R. Well it’s not so much a talent but I am a big fan of audio books and podcasts. Right now I’m listening to an audio book by Ayaan Hirsi Ali. It’s the autobiography of a woman originally from Somalia. The author reads it herself which makes it quite poignant. Last week I listened to Notorious RBG by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik, a biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Supreme Court Justice.

Translation News from Around the World

This information comes from member associations of FIT and is reprinted from Translatio.

Austrian Associations succeed in Raising Awareness on the Difference Between Translators and Interpreters

In a joint effort, the German-speaking professional associations loosely organised within the framework of what is called “Bremer Runde”, which meets several times a year to discuss issues of common interest, addressed the subject of the frequent though mistaken use of the terms “translator/translation” and “interpreter/interpretation” in the German
language.

In Austria, five independent professional associations work together under the umbrella of the “Translationsplattform” (www.translationsplattform.at), in particular to attract more attention and to give more weight to their arguments when reaching out jointly to the public or to specific stakeholders.

Acting upon the discussions within “Bremer Runde”, the Austrian associations got together to draft and send out letters to the media and to the editors of “Österreichisches Wörterbuch” (a standard monolingual German-language
dictionary that is widely used in Austrian schools). The letters clearly outlined the differences between the activities performed by translators and interpreters and proposed definitions to be added to the dictionary. They were accompanied
by a joint press release on the topic.

The Austrian associations were very pleased with the media echo their efforts received. The response of the dictionary editors is especially worth mentioning, as they welcomed the valuable input and easy-to-understand presentation of the terms in question and promised to take account of the suggestions in the next edition of the dictionary.

Dagmar Sanjath, Secretary General of UNIVERSITAS Austria, Interpreters and
Translators’ Association,
www.universitas.org

UNI 11591:2015 – Italy has its own national standard to certify translators and interpreters

Three years in the making, the new UNI standard has finally been given the green light by UNI (Italian Organization for Standardization) on September 10, 2015. It was proposed by AITI and
written in collaboration with AIDAC, AIIC, Assointerpreti, ANITI, AssiITIG and TradInFounder under the supervision of esteemed professors from the Università di Bologna, DIT Forlì, Trieste and Fondazione Universitaria San Pellegrino.

The new standard provides requirements for the knowledge, skills and competence expected from individual TSPs and ISPs in accordance with the CEN GUIDE 14:2010 (“Common policy guidance for
addressing standardisation on qualification of professions and personnel”) and the European Qualification Framework (EQF).

It outlines eight professional profiles:
conference interpreter, legal interpreter,
healthcare/medical interpreter, business interpreter, technical-scientific translator,
audio-visual script translator and dialogue writer, legal translator, and language localisation professional.

The UNI 11591:2015 was recently presented during
a road-show in Genoa, Rome, Venice, Florence,
Turin, Trento, Trieste, Ancona, and Bologna with a large audience of professionals in attendance. Plans to be in Naples and Sicily in early 2016 are
under way.

Third-party certification for translators and interpreters is likely to be available next year, once the certification schemes are drafted in compliance with ISO 17024. A milestone in the global translation and interpretation industry, the UNI 11591:2015 provides guidance for the qualification of professional translators and interpreters on the market and their clients.

Sandra Bertolini, Sandro Corradini,
Orietta Olivetti, presidenza@aiti.org

Interpreting News

It’s a new year and a good time to look at what is trending in the job market. Whether you are looking for a language service provider or you are looking to become an interpreter, the language service industry is all the buzz. This week, The DC posted an article about immigration escalation and projections. The amount of foreign born people in the US from 1880 – 1970 increased by only 40%, while the amount from 1970-2060 will have increased by 715%! That is a jaw dropping number, and a good indicator that language services will continue to grow as the country does.

The industry on a whole is in a massive state of expansion. Technological advances make language services more accessible, and therefore businesses are starting to utilize them more. Interpreters and translators are among the fastest growing career paths in the country and that is predicted to continue at least for the next decade.

Medical Mission Seeks Volunteer Interpreters

Looking for a good cause? Project H.A.N.D.S. requires certified medical interpreters for patient safety. If you are certified and can donate 10 days, Project H.A.N.D.S. is accepting applicants for their May 13 – 21, 2016 trip to Santa Cruz, Bolivia. The goal is to establish a Cervical Cancer Prevention Program. They need two Certified Medical Interpreters.

Direct inquiries to Maria Schwieter, RN, CHI, at (219) 229-5351

Interpret. Spread the word. Help others. Save lives. Join this rewarding work!

Digital Information

Our webmistress, Gigi Branch, has created instructional videos on YouTube to help our members activate their membership and set up their profile. Check them out and let us know your thoughts.

If you need helping logging into the site, just click on the following video.

This video will guide through the steps to set up your profile.

Census Bureau Reports at Least 350 Languages Spoken in U.S. Homes

postsU.S. Census Bureau released a set of new tables today detailing hundreds of languages that U.S. residents speak at home. American Community Survey data on languages spoken at home were previously available for only 39 languages. These tables, based on American Community Survey data collected from 2009 to 2013, expand the languages and language groups tabulated to 350.

These tables are among the most comprehensive data ever released from the Census Bureau on languages spoken less widely in the United States, such as Pennsylvania Dutch, Ukrainian, Turkish, Romanian, Amharic and many others. Also included are 150 different Native North American languages, collectively spoken by more than 350,000 people, including Yupik, Dakota, Apache, Keres and Cherokee.

“While most of the U.S. population speaks only English at home or a handful of other languages like Spanish or Vietnamese, the American Community Survey reveals the wide-ranging language diversity of the United States,” said Erik Vickstrom, a Census Bureau statistician. “For example, in the New York metro area alone, more than a third of the population speaks a language other than English at home, and close to 200 different languages are spoken. Knowing the number of languages and how many speak these languages in a particular area provides valuable information to policymakers, planners and researchers.”

The tables provide information on languages and language groups for counties and core-based statistical areas (metropolitan and micropolitan areas) with populations of 100,000 or more and 25,000 or more speakers of languages other than Spanish, as well as for the nation, states and Puerto Rico regardless of population size. These data show the number of speakers of each language and the number who speak English less than “very well” — a common measure of English proficiency.

In addition to making the tables available for download as a spreadsheet, the Census Bureau will release the data as part of its application programming interface, or API.languages

Highlights for the 15 largest metro areas:

New York metro area
At least 192 languages are spoken at home. 38 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Bengali, with 105,765 speakers.

Los Angeles metro area
At least 185 languages are spoken at home. 54 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Indonesian, with 12,750 speakers.

Chicago metro area
At least 153 languages are spoken at home. 29 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Serbian, with 17,490 speakers.

Dallas metro area
At least 156 languages are spoken at home. 30 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Telugu, with 12,630 speakers.

Philadelphia metro area
At least 146 languages are spoken at home. 15 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Malayalam, with 10,370 speakers.

Houston metro area
At least 145 languages are spoken at home. 37 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Tamil, with 4,690 speakers.

Washington metro area
At least 168 languages are spoken at home. 26 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Amharic, with 43,125 speakers.

Miami metro area
At least 128 languages are spoken at home. 51 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Romanian, with 5,295 speakers.

Atlanta metro area
At least 146 languages are spoken at home. 17 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Swahili, with 4,195 speakers.

Boston metro area
At least 138 languages are spoken at home. 23 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Albanian, with 6,800 speakers.

San Francisco metro area
At least 163 languages are spoken at home. 40 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Panjabi, with 19,985 speakers.

Detroit metro area
At least 126 languages are spoken at home. 12 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Syriac, with 23,175 speakers.

Riverside, Calif., metro area
At least 145 languages are spoken at home. 40 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Dutch, with 2,425 speakers.

Phoenix metro area
At least 163 languages are spoken at home. 26 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Pima, with 3,050 speakers.

Seattle metro area
At least 166 languages are spoken at home. 22 percent of the metro area population age 5 and over speak a language other than English at home. One of the smaller language groups found there is Ukrainian, with 15,850 speakers.

About the American Community Survey
The American Community Survey is the only source of small area estimates for social and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population. It gives communities the current information they need to plan investments and services. Retailers, homebuilders, police departments, and town and city planners are among the many private- and public-sector decision makers who count on these annual results. Visit the ACS helps communities page to see some examples.
These statistics would not be possible without the participation of the randomly selected households in the survey.

Candidate Statements

New York Circle of Translators 2015 Election

Candidate Statements

Miosotis Vargas (Candidate for Program Director)

The very first time I walked into a New York Circle of Translators meeting, I had no idea that it was going to change my professional life forever. I met so many wonderful high caliber people that day, including the then president Leonard Morin who so graciously welcomed me and put me in contact with people who have helped to advance my career as an interpreter.

Since that fateful day, becoming a member of the Circle has continued to exceed my expectations, and today I am running for the privilege to serve as your Program Director.

In my two enriching years at the New York Circle of Translators, I have worked with other dedicated members on an outreach initiative to bring together like-minded individuals in a symposium to advance the professionalization of public service and commercial language assistance in the New York City area.

By working on this project, I have acquired the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively serve as the new Program Director. I also have extensive experience in project management, having worked in several community-based organizations where I have lead successful campaigns and programs.

After Kate Deimling I will have big shoes to fill, but I am determined to continue serving the New York Circle of Translators by bringing the kind of quality programs that have characterized our organization for the last several years.

I love the Circle, and I am fully committed to our community and the future of the translation and interpretation industry. I am looking forward to bringing my passion and dedication to service to its members.

_____________________________________________________________________

Ana Salotti (Candidate for Program Director)

My name is Ana Salotti. I’m an English-Spanish freelance translator, and a translation instructor at Hunter College. I have had the opportunity to study translation and interpreting in two very different parts of the world: my native Argentina, where I undertook a BA in Spanish Translation back in 2005, and Australia, where I earned an MA in Interpreting and Translation Studies in 2012. I have been working as a professional translator since 2005, and as an interpreter since early 2015. I am an active member of the NYCT, and I am now honored to have been asked to run for the position of Program Director.

Coming from two diverse training settings, having worked in this field for almost ten years, and now teaching two Translation courses at Hunter College, I can see the great strengths, weaknesses and exciting opportunities lying ahead in our market. I firmly believe that the NYCT is breaking new ground with the monthly programs they have been putting together. I also believe that there is still more to do, to keep building our membership, provide ongoing learning opportunities, and educate clients and the general public on the importance of professionalization in our industry.

If elected, I will be looking forward to the opportunity of organizing relevant training workshops, talks and events with these goals in mind. I think training is the key to raising the bar of our profession. As a Program Director, I am ready to embrace that mission. I am committed to do as I as much as I can to make the NYCT the leading non-profit organization that every translator and interpreter in the city goes to for membership, training courses, interesting talks, and the latest trends in the market. I would also like to help build a higher profile for the Circle in the public eye. I promise to work with passion, and to engage in a meaningful dialogue with our members and stakeholders.

_____________________________________________________________________

Lisa M. Rodriguez (Candidate for Secretary)

The New York Circle of Translators is gaining steam, seeking ways to support current members and to encourage other professionals to join us. The current Board has provided useful and interesting opportunities for members to learn about different aspects of translation and interpreting. Their efforts have inspired me to join in, and I would like to contribute to our organization’s efforts as Secretary for the 2016 term.

To help you make your decision about the position of Secretary, I would like to offer a summary of my professional background. I have been a professional translator since 2011. I am ATA Certified in Spanish to English Translation, and I hold the NYU School of Continuing and Professional Studies Certificate in French to English Translation.

I was raised in Union County, New Jersey. After completing my B.A. at Lynchburg College in Virginia, I lived in Spain for sixteen years. There, I worked as an English teacher, and I obtained a Licenciatura from the University of Seville. Upon returning to the U.S., I worked in the financial services sector for eleven years. For two of those years I was a secretary, after which I worked in positions which involved trade support, operational and record keeping functions for my department. In 2011, my job in financial services moved to the West coast.

At that time, I decided to seek a profession in which I could combine my experience with languages with my experience in business. Friends and acquaintances working in translation generously offered information and training. The conferences, training and support I experienced helped me conclude that freelance translation was the right choice for me.

It was one of the best decisions of my life. Courses and information offered through the ATA and its members allowed me a relatively smooth transition, and I currently work from a home office as Constantia Language Services LLC. The word Constantia is Latin for perseverance. As all translators and interpreters know, perseverance is key to developing the complex language and business skills necessary for success in our field.

As Secretary, I would not bring decades of experience as a translator or interpreter to the table. However, I have a broad-based and multi-cultural work background, and I have the writing skills, discipline and availability necessary to fulfill the responsibilities of the position.

Most important, I am eager for an opportunity to work with the current board members to support the growth and modernization of our organization. It would be an honor to serve the NYCT as Secretary. Thank you for reading my statement and considering my candidacy.

_____________________________________________________________________

Andre Kononenko (Candidate for Treasurer)

I am excited to accept the nomination to run for Treasurer of the NYCT. I have been a member of NYCT for 3 years now and have been impressed with the latest improvements and accomplishments that current leadership is actively pursuing. I am particularly motivated to work on supporting efforts for continued improvements and increasing overall member satisfaction with benefits that an NYCT membership offers.

I believe I have a number of valuable qualities I would bring to the position of Treasurer. First, I have 15+ years of practical experience as a business analyst in a large financial organization, which should allow me to accurately record, keep and maintain accounting information as well as prepare financial reports and balance sheets. I am confident that my MBA degree will complement my experience in all matters related to keeping books and records at the highest level of proficiency and to the highest standard of integrity.

Secondly, my experience and relationships with NYCT members and the Circle’s leadership would allow me to step into the role quickly.

Finally, I have energy and passion to serve the NYCT and consider it a great privilege to be of service to an organization that I fully support and endorse. As a translator, I know firsthand how important and valuable peer support and encouragement are to any translator or interpreter, to one who is just starting or to one with many years of experience. I can’t think of a better way to integrate my passion for supporting a professional group and my dedication to service than through this organization. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or comments about my candidacy for this position, by phone (203) 273-5691 or via email: akonon@aol.com.

Sincerely yours,
Andre Kononenko