The French-American Foundation, with the long-standing support of the Florence Gould Foundation, is currently accepting submissions for the 29th Annual Translation Prize

The Foundations will present a $10,000 award for the best English translation of French in both fiction and nonfiction. Translations for consideration must have been published for the first time in the United States between January 1 and December 31, 2015.Effiel

To apply, or for more information, please visit: frenchamerican.org/tp-submissions.

Since 1986, the Translation Prize has established itself as a valuable element of the intellectual and cultural exchange between France and the United States. The Translation Prize promotes French literature in the United States and provides translators and their craft with greater visibility among publishers and readers. The prize also seeks to increase the visibility of the publishers who bring these important French works of literature to the American market in translations of exceptional quality.
The French-American Foundation looks forward to receiving your submissions by January 15, 2016.
Best of luck!
Ilana Adleson
Program Officer
FRENCH-AMERICAN FOUNDATION
iadleson@frenchamerican.org
646.588.6782

Member News:

In November, Kate Deimling’s translation of Vino Business: The Cloudy World of French Wine, an exposé of the French wine industry by journalist Isabelle Saporta, was published by Grove Atlantic. In its review, Publishers Weekly says “Saporta’s precision in identifying her targets and laying out supporting evidence adds drama to an already-melodramatic saga, and teetotalers and oenophiles alike will find it hard to resist.”

This past August Taschen published Circle VP Alta Price’s English translation of The Book Cover in the Weimar Republic, a landmark, bilingual tome on book cover design in Weimar Germany, which was recently selected as a “best book of November” by Perlentaucher. Her latest book translation, The Dynamic Library, was released by Soberscove Press this week. She spent mid-October in residency at Übersetzerhaus Looren in Switzerland, and at the end of the month co-moderated a panel on women in translation at the 38th annual American Literary Translators Association conference in Tucson. Next on her plate: catching up with many of you at the NYCT Holiday gathering!

NYCT member and Portuguese > English translator Olinda Azevedo Perez is the new Program Administrator at NYU’s School of Professional Studies, Center for Applied Liberal Arts. CALA offers programming in foreign languages, translation, and interpreting.

Open Call – Interpreters Language Study

At the age of ten my school removed me from French class. “He shows problems at school, has challenges with modern languages and should be held back a year,” wrote my teacher.

My French language block changed to a tutor. They gave me supplementary classes – math and language arts. As a stranger, the French teacher would only allow me back to observe the class – not to be graded, marked or taken earnestly. Students surrounded me months ahead of my level. To pop up amongst the lessons on the past tense of être was a struggle.

Fast-forward 15 years. Currently my “languages learned” count stands at 9 – my top three languages are Deutsch, Español and 中文. Turns out there wasn’t much of a challenge but rather a hunger for languages. You can call me Andrew Carson – a language nerd, MBA degree holder, marketer and entrepreneur.

Today my tongues constantly demonstrate to me the power and relevance of other languages. As translators you have front row seats to the spectacle. Through your careers you have worked between languages. You have seen the underbelly of the beast and understand the role they play to uphold progress. Whether your work revolves around conferences or two-person exchanges, there are always thoughts to shuttle across the gap.

Now here’s where you can help me out.

Currently my energy has been focused on a set of language projects around NYC. One project looks at oral translators – at the moment they change between source and target languages. The study seeks to understand how languages are absorbed at that second and how they are processed. The project hopes to uncover common themes among translators and across careers.

So far the project has collected the anecdotes of 15 translators through casual tête-à-têtes at cafes around NYC. Many oral translators have offered remarkable accounts of how they process language already and hopefully you can too.

Do you have a few seconds to chat about your career?

Now, you’re busy and don’t have much space on your schedule to relax at a café and chat – understood. However the above paragraphs were just as hard for me to compose and work out as your schedule. The above text was constructed as a “Lipogram of I”. No letter “I” was ever used here. For the record, “is,” “interview” and “interpreter” were pretty hard to evade. For more “information,” or to “join” the study please feel free to “email” me – Andrew.p.carson@me.com

Regionalisms: Pitfalls for Court Interpreters in Varieties of Spanish

The different varieties of the Spanish language pose a major challenge to interpreters. Each Spanish-speaking country has its own accent, and accents may vary again within a given Spanish-speaking country. In addition, lexical differences add another level of complication: some specific words may vary in meaning from one country to another, while different countries may use different words altogether to refer to the same thing.

In this workshop, Anthony Rivas will review these varieties of Spanish, with special attention on how interpreters can best prepare to handle them in a legal setting.

Regionalisms
Date: Saturday, December 5, 2015
Time: 10 a.m. — 1 p.m. PST (1 — 4 p.m. EST)
Cost: $100 Register by November 14 for a 10% discount!

REGISTER

Instructor: Anthony T. Rivas, FCCI
CEUs available:
ATA 3 points; NAJIT 3 credits; California 3 CIMCE hours L 3504; Florida 3.8 CIE credits, 15-0094; Tennessee 3 FL; Texas and Washington state CEUs pending!

NCI webinars use Adobe Connect. You don’t need to download any software ahead of time to join the webinar. Watch a short video about Adobe Connect and its features here.

NCI alums: Don’t forget to use your code for an extra 10% off!
Questions? 520-621-3615 or ncitrp@email.arizona.edu.